EVENT DETAILS
Wednesday, October 24, 2018
Sheraton LaGuardia East Hotel
135-20 39th Avenue,
Flushing, NY 11354
Time
8:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Total Credits
7.5 Contact Hour(s)
Target Audience
Nurse , Pharmacist , Pharmacy Technician
Cost
$129.00
Registration closes on 10/23/2018 at 11:00 PM
 

Registration will be held from 8:00 am - 8:30 am. Continental breakfast will be served during this time.

A plated lunch will be served from 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm.

Refreshments will be served during the afternoon programs.

If you would like a copy of all slides in one document, click HERE

 

 

AGENDA

Scheduled CE Activities Wednesday, October 24, 2018
  
Medical marijuana has only been legal in New York State since 2015. While Buy-in from providers has been impressive, there still remains an overall low number of providers registered with the program, especially upstate. There are not many avenues in which to learn more about medical marijuana in New York State, as many online programs are expensive. Other studies have shown that provider attitudes can be slow to change, and determine that additional educational opportunities are sorely needed. Medical marijuana can be an effective therapy, including for people living with HIV, and more providers need to be informed of the medicinal qualities in order to best serve their patients.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Describe the current landscape of medical marijuana
  • Compare the available forms of medical marijuana in New York State and their indications
  • Discuss the use of medical marijuana for people living with HIV/AIDS
Pharmacy Technician Learning Objectives
  • Describe the current landscape of medical marijuana
  • Compare the available forms of medical marijuana in New York State and their indications
  • Discuss the use of medical marijuana for people living with HIV/AIDS
 
Faculty
Jessica Robinson-PappMD, MS, FAAN
Associate Professor of Neurology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
 
ACPE UAN
0280-9999-18-070-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-9999-18-070-L01-T (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1.5
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
Clinical Education Initiative
 
According to the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder worldwide with an estimated prevalence rate of 10-15%.  While most patients do not recognize the symptoms as IBS it is the most common disorder seen and diagnosed by gastroenterologists.  In the United States between 2.4-3.5 million physician visits take place annually for symptoms related to IBS.  While IBS appears to be more common among females approximately 35-40% of males may experience symptoms related to IBS as well.  There are different types of IBS resulting in varying symptoms and treatments.  This knowledge-based activity will educate pharmacists on the diagnosis and management of IBS, as well as the importance of counseling patients to adhere to lifestyle modifications and their treatment.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Define Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and its diagnostic criteria
  • Recognize the pathophysiology and symptomatology of IBS
  • Determine the risk factors and comorbidities related to IBS
  • Identify effective elements of an appropriate drug therapy evaluation for IBS
  • Recommend nonpharmacological measures to manage the symptoms of IBS when counseling patients
Pharmacy Technician Learning Objectives
  • Define Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and its diagnostic criteria
  • Recognize the pathophysiology and symptomatology of IBS
  • Determine the risk factors and comorbidities related to IBS
  • Identify effective elements of an appropriate drug therapy evaluation for IBS
  • Recommend nonpharmacological measures to manage the symptoms of IBS when counseling patients
 
Faculty
Brooke FidlerPharmD
Associate Professor, LIU Pharmacy, Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-076-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-18-076-L01-T (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1.5
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
Patients with diabetes are also much more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease than those without diabetes. In fact, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death associated with diabetes – certainly a medical double jeopardy. The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) recently published the 2017 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes and included new recommendations on treating both diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Pharmacists are often the medical professional that patients reach out to for guidance and explanation on new pharmaco-therapy and individualized treatment. This program will review the ADA’s latest update to the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, review recent outcomes trials of antihyperglycemic therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and outline evidence based treatment strategies to mitigate the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with T2D.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Summarize the ADA and AACE guidelines with respect to efficacy and safety particularly when analyzing cardiovascular and renal outcomes.
  • Recognize the drug therapies that show evidence of benefit in improving blood sugars and decreasing risk of cardiovascular and renal events
  • Identify guidelines that are recommended by the ADA and AACE for CV risk reduction and the others in this class.
Pharmacy Technician Learning Objectives
  • Review how different treatment options work to lower blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes
  • Recognize the effects of diabetes agents on glycosylated hemoglobin levels (A1c)
  • List some common safety concerns about different agents used to treat type 2 diabetes
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Summarize the ADA and AACE guidelines with respect to efficacy and safety particularly when analyzing cardiovascular and renal outcomes.
  • Recognize the drug therapies that show evidence of benefit in improving blood sugars and decreasing risk of cardiovascular and renal events
  • Identify guidelines that are recommended by the ADA and AACE for CV risk reduction and the others in this class.
 
Faculty
Tamara GoldbergPharmD, BCPS
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Long Island University
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-077-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-18-077-L01-T (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-18-077-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
2
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
Novo Nordisk
 
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Identify the Opioid Overdose Prevention Program and how it works in New York State;
  • Describe the epidemiology and physiology of opioid overdose
  • Describe and present a brief training to a patient requesting naloxone
  • Identify how the Naloxone Co-Payment Assistance Program (N-CAP) works
  • State the billing process associated with N-CAP
  • Determine the rationale and recognize regulations regarding the Expanded Syringe Access Program
  • Recognize basics of medication assisted treatment and buprenorphine
Pharmacy Technician Learning Objectives
  • Identify the Opioid Overdose Prevention Program and how it works in New York State;
  • Describe the epidemiology and physiology of opioid overdose
  • Describe and present a brief training to a patient requesting naloxone
  • Identify how the Naloxone Co-Payment Assistance Program (N-CAP) works
  • State the billing process associated with N-CAP
  • Determine the rationale and recognize regulations regarding the Expanded Syringe Access Program
  • Recognize basics of medication assisted treatment and buprenorphine
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Identify the Opioid Overdose Prevention Program and how it works in New York State;
  • Describe the epidemiology and physiology of opioid overdose
  • Describe and present a brief training to a patient requesting naloxone
  • Identify how the Naloxone Co-Payment Assistance Program (N-CAP) works
  • State the billing process associated with N-CAP
  • Determine the rationale and recognize regulations regarding the Expanded Syringe Access Program
  • Recognize basics of medication assisted treatment and buprenorphine
 
Faculty
Sharon StancliffMD, FAAFP, FASAM
Medical Consultant, AIDS Institute, New York State Department of Health
 
ACPE UAN
0280-9999-18-079-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-9999-18-079-L04-T (Knowledge-Based)
0280-9999-18-079-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1.5
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
AIDS Institute, New York State Department of Health
 
Healthcare teams boast unprecedented resources and tools for reduction in medication error.  Despite staggering technological advances, errors continue.  In fact, new opportunities for error have emerged with some of the very tools intended to eliminate systematic errors.  Using established psychological principles, human engineering factors are examined and extrapolated to the unique challenges of the contemporary pharmacy setting.  Recurring problematic areas in pharmacy practice will be extensively examined in the context of practical pharmacy practice. 

 

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the medication safety challenges brought on by computerized physician order entry
  • Identify tools and models for error reduction and patient safety advocacy
  • Recognize the national trends in pharmacy technician education and training standards
  • Identify error prone abbreviations from ISMP’s “Do Not Use” list
Pharmacy Technician Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the medication safety challenges brought on by computerized physician order entry
  • Identify tools and models for error reduction and patient safety advocacy
  • Recognize the national trends in pharmacy technician education and training standards
  • Identify error prone abbreviations from ISMP’s “Do Not Use” list
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the medication safety challenges brought on by computerized physician order entry
  • Identify tools and models for error reduction and patient safety advocacy
  • Recognize the national trends in pharmacy technician education and training standards
  • Identify error prone abbreviations from ISMP’s “Do Not Use” list
 
Faculty
Kevin HopeRPh
Clinical Education Specialist and Continuing Education Administrator, PharmCon, Inc.; Advisory Board Member, Paradigm Education Solutions; Nuclear Pharmacist, Triad Isotopes
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-078-L05-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-18-078-L05-T (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-18-078-L05-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
 
 
 
Requirements for CE Credit
  • Participant Requirement and Statement of Credit: To receive credit, participants must fully attend each session (no partial credit will be awarded), pass in a completed attendance verification form, and using the access code provided, complete the online evaluation for each session attended. Attendance will be verified. All participants will have the opportunity to evaluate the educational sessions and presenters as well as the ability to identify their
  • Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians: CE credit will be automatically uploaded to CPE Monitor upon completion of the evaluation and posted to the participant’s NABP account within 72 hours where an official certificate of credit can be printed. Evaluations must be completed within 60 days of program date to receive credit.
  • Statement of Disclosure: Disclosure will be made on the day of the program regarding any interest or affiliation a speaker may have with a supporting organization.
  • Refund Policy: A full refund will be provided only if a written request is received by American Health Resources, LLC at least 48 hours prior to the program or if the program is cancelled. American Health Resources, LLC reserves the right to change the presenters, topics or seminar schedules.
 
Only Certificates of Credit issued from CPE Monitor are valid in the US.
CPE Monitor will not accept credits after 60 days from the session date.
 
Supported By:
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
Registration closes on 10/23/2018 at 11:00 PM
 

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