EVENT DETAILS
Tuesday, May 15, 2018
Red Lion Hotel
100 Berlin Road,
Cromwell, CT 06416
Time
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Total Credits
7 Contact Hour(s)
Target Audience
Pharmacist , Pharmacy Technician
Cost
$129.00
Registration closes on 5/14/2018 at 11:00 PM
 

Registration will be held from 8:00 am - 8:30 am. Continental breakfast will be served during this time.

A plated lunch will be served from 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm.

Refreshments will be served during the afternoon programs.

 

AGENDA

Scheduled CE Activities Tuesday, May 15, 2018
  
Patients with diabetes are also much more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease than those without diabetes. In fact, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death associated with diabetes – certainly a medical double jeopardy. The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) recently published the 2017 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes and included new recommendations on treating both diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Pharmacists are often the medical professional that patients reach out to for guidance and explanation on new pharmaco-therapy and individualized treatment. This program will review the ADA’s latest update to the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, review recent outcomes trials of antihyperglycemic therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and outline evidence based treatment strategies to mitigate the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with T2D.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Identify the diabetes medications that are recommended by the ADA and the AACE guidelines in people with cardiovascular and renal risks.
  • Recognize the drug therapies that show evidence of benefit in improving blood sugars and decreasing risk of cardiovascular and renal events.
  • Identify guidelines that are recommended by the ADA and AACE for CV risk reduction and the others in this class.
Pharmacy Technician Learning Objectives
  • Summarize the ADA and AACE guidelines with respect to efficacy and safety particularly when analyzing cardiovascular and renal outcomes.
  • Recognize evidence-based treatment options that optimize glycemic, cardiovascular, and renal outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes.
  • Communicate the potential cardiovascular benefits and risk of various treatment approaches for diabetes to patients and members of the healthcare team.
 
Faculty
Dhiren PatelPharmD, CDE, BC-ADM, BCACP
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, MCPHS University
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-021-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-18-021-L01-T (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
2
 
Handouts
 
The rate of overdose deaths in the United States tripled between 1999 and 2016, and over 100 Americans die per day from an opioid overdose. Termed a national emergency and a public health crisis, the opioid epidemic is of particular importance locally: recently, absolute deaths from synthetic opioids and from heroin in Connecticut have been among the highest in the nation. Comprehensive efforts to optimize implementation of evidence-based strategies to treat opioid use disorder (i.e. buprenorphine, methadone, and naltrexone) and reduce harm from opioid use (e.g., overdose education and distribution of the opioid antagonist naloxone for overdose reversal) are actively needed. This continuing education program for pharmacists and pharmacy technicians will describe trends in the epidemiology of opioid use disorder and opioid overdose, explain the evidence-based medication treatments for opioid use disorder, and empower pharmacists and pharmacy technicians in their roles in reducing harm from opioid use through educating and providing naloxone to patients.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Describe the trends and epidemiology of opioid use disorder and opioid overdose and associated risk factors
  • Understand the pharmacology of evidence-based medication treatments for opioid use disorder
  • Be able to counsel patients about the use of naloxone for overdose prevention
Pharmacy Technician Learning Objectives
  • Describe the trends and epidemiology of opioid use disorder and opioid overdose
  • Explain evidence-based medication treatments for opioid use disorder
  • Discuss the use of naloxone for overdose prevention with patients
 
Faculty
E. Jennifer EdelmanMD, MHS
Assistant Professor of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine and Public Health
Benjamin OldfieldMD
Postdoctoral Fellow, National Clinician Scholars Program, Yale School of Medicine
 
ACPE UAN
0280-9999-18-022-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-9999-18-022-L04-T (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1.5
 
Handouts
 
Healthcare teams boast unprecedented resources and tools for reduction in medication error. Despite staggering technological advances, errors continue. In fact, new opportunities for error have emerged with some of the very tools intended to eliminate systematic errors. Using established psychological principles, human engineering factors are examined and extrapolated to the unique challenges of the contemporary pharmacy setting. Recurring problematic areas in pharmacy practice will be extensively examined within the framework of an effective Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Plan and appropriate use of the Root Cause Analysis (RCA) method in identifying, reporting, and evaluating sentinel events.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Describe the medication safety challenges brought on by computerized physician order entry
  • Identify tools and models for error reduction and patient safety advocacy
  • Describe the national trends in pharmacy technician education and training standards
  • Identify error-prone abbreviations from ISMP’s “Do Not Use” list
Pharmacy Technician Learning Objectives
  • Describe the medication safety challenges brought on by computerized physician order entry
  • Identify tools and models for error reduction and patient safety advocacy
  • Describe the national trends in pharmacy technician education and training standards
  • Identify error-prone abbreviations from ISMP’s “Do Not Use” list
 
Faculty
Kevin HopeRPh
Clinical Education Specialist and Continuing Education Administrator, PharmCon, Inc.; Advisory Board Member, Paradigm Education Solutions; Nuclear Pharmacist, Triad Isotopes
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-015-L05-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-18-015-L05-T (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1.5
 
Handouts
 
This activity will examine the duties that pharmacists may now have to patients- that is an expanded duty of care-even when the patient is not receiving a prescription, based on the notion that a prescriber may be required to be notified by a pharmacist when the pharmacists' actions on behalf are insufficient for the patient's insurer to properly adjudicate a claim. Will pharmacists be held to a higher standard of care, and have a greater duty imposed as a result if recent case law? In addition, attendees will be required to analyze recent sanctions issued by the CT Commission of Pharmacy to fellow pharmacy colleagues and consider why certain allegations of misconduct are treated more harshly than others.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Explain hypotheticals and recent case law in which a patient alleges harm as a result of a pharmacists' omission to act when a duty exists.
  • Review the legal arguments presented in the recent case before the MA Supreme Judicial Court in Correa v. Schoeck, SJC- 12409, regarding the scope of a pharmacists duty to a patient.
  • Discuss the notion of whether a pharmacist has a right to refuse to fill certain prescriptions
  • Analyze recent disciplinary sanctions meted out by the CT Commission of Pharmacy.
Pharmacy Technician Learning Objectives
  • Describe what is meant by omission to act when a duty exists.
  • Identify the legal implications of a pharmacy's refusal to fill certain prescriptions.
  • Identify the outcome of recent disciplinary sanctions meted out by the CT Commission of Pharmacy.
 
Faculty
Paul GarbariniJD, RPh
Private Law Practice, Northampton, Massachusetts Adjunct Faculty, Northeastern University, Bouve College of Pharmacy
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-025-L03-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-18-025-L03-T (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
2
 
Handouts
 
 
 
 
Requirements for CE Credit
  • Participant Requirement and Statement of Credit: To receive credit, participants must fully attend each session (no partial credit will be awarded), pass in a completed attendance verification form, and using the access code provided, complete the online evaluation for each session attended. Attendance will be verified. All participants will have the opportunity to evaluate the educational sessions and presenters as well as the ability to identify their
  • Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians: CE credit will be automatically uploaded to CPE Monitor upon completion of the evaluation and posted to the participant’s NABP account within 72 hours where an official certificate of credit can be printed. Evaluations must be completed within 60 days of program date to receive credit.
  • Statement of Disclosure: Disclosure will be made on the day of the program regarding any interest or affiliation a speaker may have with a supporting organization.
  • Refund Policy: A full refund will be provided only if a written request is received by American Health Resources, LLC at least 48 hours prior to the program or if the program is cancelled. American Health Resources, LLC reserves the right to change the presenters, topics or seminar schedules.
 
Only Certificates of Credit issued from CPE Monitor are valid in the US.
CPE Monitor will not accept credits after 60 days from the session date.
 
Registration closes on 5/14/2018 at 11:00 PM
 

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