EVENT DETAILS
Friday, October 12, 2018
Boston Marriott Burlington
1 Burlington Mall Road,
Burlington, MA 01803
Dates
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Total Credits
16 Contact Hour(s)
Target Audience
Pharmacist
Cost
$160.00
Registration closes on 10/11/2018 at 11:00 PM
 

Single-day registration IS available. Please call our office at (843) 488-5550 for one-day registration information.

Educational Sponsor
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Association Sponsors
Oncology Nursing Society - New Hampshire/Vermont Chapter     Boston Oncology Nursing Society     Massachusetts Society of Health-System Pharmacists

Platinum Sponsors
Amgen, Inc.   Bayer AG     Janssen Pharmaceutica NV
Gold Sponsor
Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Ltd.
Silver Sponsors
Eli Lilly and Company   Merck & Co.     Pfizer Inc.

This conference has been supported, in part by educational grants from:
Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celgene Corporation, Eli Lilly and Company, Merck & Co., Mylan N.V., Sandoz Inc., a Novartis Division, and Sanofi Genzyme

 

AGENDA

Scheduled CE Activities Friday, October 12, 2018
  
Drug shortages can have a significant impact on patient care causing treatment delays, disparities and even medication errors. This presentation will discuss factors contributing to medication shortages. It will review the effects of shortages on patient outcomes, due to alternative medications, treatment delays, or treatment omissions. Medication errors resulting from changes in drug containers, medication sequestering, among other causes will be highlighted to bring forth awareness and to promote proactive risk assessments as new temporary products are brought into an institution. Strategies to mitigate the negative impact of these shortages will be discussed.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Discuss the impact of drug shortages on patient care
  • Understand the cases of drug shortages
  • Examine medication errors and adverse events due to drug shortages
  • Identify methods to mitigate the effects of drug shortages
 
Faculty
Audrea SzabaturaPharmD, BCOP
Medication Safety Officer, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
 
ACPE UAN
0280-9999-18-066-L05-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc
 
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common type of leukemia in adults and therapies have advanced into treatment with oral therapies. Pharmacists are uniquely positioned to manage and counsel patients as well as advise other health care professionals about adverse events and evolving therapeutic oral oncolytic options. This presentation will provide information on utilizing patient-specific prognostic factors to optimize treatment selections.  Evidence for current and emerging therapies for treatment of CLL  as well as management strategies to mitigate toxicities will be discussed. 
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Describe prognostic indicators utilized to individualize therapy decisions for patients with CLL
  • Identify the efficacy and evolving roles of agents in the treatment of CLL
  • Describe toxicities and management recommendations associated with therapies for CLL
 
Faculty
Amy SeungPharmD, BCOP
Senior Director, Clinical Development, AssistRx, Orlando, FL
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-030-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
New therapies in myeloma have improved overall disease and symptom outcomes, however, room for improvement continues to exist. Lytic lesions as a presenting sign of myeloma are common, with up to 60% of patients having them present at diagnosis. Recently, denosumab was approved, as an alternative to bisphosphonates, for prevention of skeletal-related events, and this session will address new information on bone health, clinical trial data, and drivers of agent selection. Additionally, new information on smoldering myeloma and risk of progression to active disease has evolved, with a concurrent understanding of agents with a favorable risk-benefit profile for patients with higher risk smoldering disease. Trials have and are evaluating agents such as lenalidomide and daratumumab for therapy, and targeting the B cell maturation antigen (BCMA). Enrollment and patient-specific criteria will be discussed.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Identify novel and emerging therapeutic options and mechanisms of action in bone disease, smoldering myeloma, and immunotherapy of myeloma with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy
  • Assess the efficacy and safety of current and emerging treatments for each area
  • Apply evidence-based approaches to select myeloma patients who are likely to benefit from these options
 
Faculty
R. Donald HarveyPharmD, BCOP, FCCP, FHOPA
Associate Professor, Hematology/Medical Oncology, Director, Phase 1 Clinical Trials Section, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-061-L01-P (Application-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
In this talk, Drs. Scullion and Brandoff will review best practices relative to cancer pain management in the setting of substance misuse and the opioid crisis.   They will review current data and statistics relative to prescribing and opioid overdoses; they will explain current regulations and how they impact cancer-related pain management, and they will offer suggestions for clinical management relative to these comorbidities.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Apply risk assessment and mitigation strategies into opioid pain management plans in oncology patients
  • Identify opioid sparing pain management strategies and their place in therapy
  • Review regulations that impact the management of cancer pain
 
Faculty
Bridget ScullionPharmD, BCOP
Director, Clinical Pharmacy Services, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Douglas BrandoffMD
Director, Opioid Safety and Compliance, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
 
ACPE UAN
0280-9999-18-065-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc
 
Over the past 10-15 years, the number of treatment options for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has increased dramatically. The purpose of this activity is to educate, pharmacists, nurses and other healthcare providers on the current and up-and-coming treatment options for RCC, as well as how to manage the most common adverse effects of these latest options.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Review the current treatment options for renal cell carcinoma based on disease and patient characteristics
  • Describe the dosing, monitoring, and adverse events associated with the newest treatment options for metastatic renal cell carcinoma
  • Review the future direction of systemic treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma
 
Faculty
Sherry Mori VogtPharmD, BCOP
Clinical Specialist Pharmacist, The James Cancer Hospital at The Ohio State University
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-067-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
The purpose of this activity is to educate pharmacists on the requirements for compliance with USP <800> Hazardous Drugs - Handling in Health Care Settings. The presentation will encompass facility design criteria, use of the NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Health Care Settings to create an Assessment of Risk, and work practices that support safety when handling hazardous drugs
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Describe and review the document that must be used to develop an Assessment of Risk
  • Explain the types of facility design allowed for compounding HDs
  • Define the use of CSTDs when compounding and administering HDs
 
Faculty
Patricia KienleRPh, MPA, FASHP
Director of Accreditation and Medication Safety, Cardinal Health Innovative Delivery Solutions
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-029-L07-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
In 2018, an estimated 91,270 patients will be diagnosed with and about 9,320 patients will die of melanoma in the United States.1 The incidence of melanoma is on the rise however, the estimated deaths are decreasing.  This cancer is curable in early stages, treatment however continues to be a challenge, especially for advanced melanoma.  Until recently, treatment options for melanoma have been limited.  Three important breakthroughs in basic science research have transformed the treatment of melanoma:  (1) the discovery of the immune checkpoint cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), (2) the identification of activating BRAF mutations in melanoma, and (3) monoclonal antibodies against programmed death (PD-1).2 Clinical trials continue to support the use of these in agents in patients both in the adjuvant and advanced setting.  Questions still exist however about appropriate staging, biopsy methods, combinations, sequencing, and the role of new drug therapies. As data develops and matures, treatment for melanoma continues to be an evolving paradigm.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Discuss updated efficacy and safety data for the treatment of melanoma
  • Identify any recent guideline changes or treatment recommendations
  • Review the role of new drug entities, combination therapy, and appropriate sequencing of therapies
 
Faculty
LeAnn NorrisPharmD, FCCP, BCPS, BCOP
Clinical Associate Professor, University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-060-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 

Scheduled CE Activities Saturday, October 13, 2018
  
Due to the expanding data supporting molecular tumor boards and precision medicine in the field of oncology, oncology pharmacists need to be aware of how these tumor boards are implemented and review the clinical outcomes associated with tumor sequencing and targeted therapy.This activity will educate pharmacists on advances in molecular profiling in solid tumors, review the history of genomics as well as novel advances in targeted therapeutics as it relates to molecular tumor board.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Review the history and diagnostic analysis of next generation sequencing in tumor tissue
  • Discuss clinical trials that have used genotyping to guide therapy in oncologic malignancies
  • Identify the limitations and ethical issues of using next generation sequencing for determining standard of care therapy
 
Faculty
Patrick KielPharmD, BCPS, BCOP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Hematology/Oncology, Precision Genomics Program; Director, PGY2 Oncology Pharmacy Residency, IU Simon Cancer Center
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-031-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
CAR T-cell therapy has emerged as an important but toxic immunotherapy for the treatment of cancers. Both commercial products require strict REMS requirements due to their toxicity profile. It is crucial for pharmacists to understand the role of CAR T-cell therapies, the monitoring, prevention and treatment of the commercial products, and REMS requirements.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Describe the mechanism of action of the commercial CAR T-cell therapies, axicabtagene cicloceucel (axi-cel) and tisagenlecleucel
  • Review the clinical efficacy, safety, and place in therapy of CAR T-cell therapy for diffuse large b-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)
  • Discuss the monitoring and the management of potential adverse effects of CAR T-cell therapy
  • Review the logistical factors that play a role in treating patients with commercial CAR T-cell therapies.
 
Faculty
Hillary PrescottPharmD, BCOP
Manager, Clinical Pharmacy Services; PGY2 Oncology Residency Director, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
 
ACPE UAN
0280-9999-18-064-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc
 
Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICPIs) have changed the landscape of advanced cancer treatment during the last few years. Blockade with antibodies against cyotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death-protein 1 (PD-1) or its ligand (PD-L1) augment the immunologic reaction against tumor cells in several cancer types.

CTLA-4 is part of the B7:CD28 immunoglobulin family found on the surface of T-cells and transmits an inhibitory signal to the Tcell. Ipilimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody against CTLA-4 binding of which leads to deactivation of the inhibitory signal of the T-cell. PD-1 is expressed on T-cells and binds to its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 that are expressed on cancer cells and other immune cells. Antibodies against PD-1, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab or PD-L1, such as dudurvaluvumab, atezolizumab and alvelumab increase the anti-tumor T-cell response by blocking the interaction of PD-L1 to prevent T-cell inactivation.

Immune-related adverse events (irAEs) from occur as a consequence of impaired self-tolerance from loss of T-cell inhibition. They can potentially involve every organ system but gastrointestinal, dermatologic, hepatic and endocrine toxicities predominate. These side effects are generally manageable but can be fatal in some cases Their appearance may be subclinical and early diagnosis and management present challenges for the healthcare team. This presentation will focus on irAE’s encountered during treatment with immunotherapy and address mitigation strategies to manage these side effects during the course of a patients cancer treatment.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Review immunotherapy indications and approvals in oncology
  • Summarize current side effect profiles of immunotherapy immune related adverse events
  • Identify strategies to recognize and manage adverse events due to the use of immunotherapies
 
Faculty
Ali McBridePharmD, MS, BCOP, FAzPA, FASHP
Clinical Coordinator of Hematology/Oncology ,The University of Arizona Cancer Center; Clinical Assistant Professor, The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-069-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
Non-Hodgkins Lymphomas are divided into several subtypes each having differences in genetics, cellular properties and therapeutic decision meeting. Just at the American Society of Hematology meeting in December of 2017 there were several sessions describing novel mechanisms in NHL biology, updates in genetics of NHL, molecular approaches to targeting NHL,  immune biomarkers in NHL, and how all of these relate to treatment decisions. With over 50 agents approved for NHL and several recent approvals  including immune therapies there are many new options. Clinicians need to have a good understanding of these options and how they fit into clinical practice.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Define the different types of NHL
  • Describe changes in the genetic makeup of different types of NHL and how this could be used for therapeutic decision making
  • Utilize pharmacologic principles of therapeutic agents to develop chemotherapy rationales for treatment
 
Faculty
David FramePharmD
Assistant Professor, University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, Hematology/Oncology/BMT Clinical Specialist, University of Michigan Health System
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-068-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
Pressures to control and reduce medical costs in the US is a top priority. The oncology arena is a particular challenge due to the high cost of oncolytics and the multiple treatment modalities. New oncolytics that are more tumor specific may help to reduce overall costs. Other approaches looking at total cost of care, minimizing duplication of care and taking risk for portions of the care of cancer patients are changing the landscape. Medicare reimbursement continues to move away from specific drug reimbursement toward bundles. Maximizing reimbursement for drugs in Outpatient oncology requires specific knowledge of the details of the OPPS and requires strict processes to assure appropriate reimbursement for drugs according to the regulations.  The options to purchase medications under 340B provisions has provided relief in the past for covered entities. Recent changes to the 340B program have reduced reimbursement for covered drugs and covered entities adding pressure to the financial stability of oncology programs and health systems. Pharmacy’s understanding of all the financial factors in the treatment of oncology patients is fundamental and essential in addition to the clinical approaches to care. 
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Identify cost effective sites of service for oncology patients
  • Review current reimbursement regulations and the impact on providers and patients
  • Understand changes in the landscape due to mergers and acquisitions
 
Faculty
Ernest Anderson, JrRPh, MS, FASHP, FMSHP
President, Ernest R Anderson, Jr Consulting Inc
 
ACPE UAN
0280-9999-18-058-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc
 
Globally, esophagogastric cancers are one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and a leading cause of cancer deaths. The incidence of esophagogastric cancers in the United States has declined over the last 10 years and 5-year overall survival has improved. However, esophagogastric cancers are often diagnosed in an advanced stage where the 5-year survival is 5.3%. The treatment of these cancers often involves surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. The advent of targeted and immunotherapy have yielded improvements in survival given either in combination or as a single agent in patients with advanced disease.  
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Describe the current use of chemotherapy and radiation in the treatment of esophagogastric cancers
  • Interpret the use of targeted therapies and immunotherapy in the management of esophagogastric cancers
  • Evaluate supportive care and survivorship interventions for patients with esophagogastric cancers
 
Faculty
Cindy O'BryantPharmD, BCOP, FCCP, FHOPA
Professor, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-063-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
The purpose of this activity is to educate pharmacists on the efficacy, toxicity, and place in therapy for the new lung cancer drugs. The presentation will discuss the pivotal study data for new regimens used for locally advanced and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Identify the appropriate place in therapy for new immunotherapy combination regimens including the benefit as compared to the standard treatment
  • Describe common and unique toxicities associated with immunotherapy combination regimens to optimize monitoring and patient counseling
  • Recommend appropriate toxicity prevention and treatment measures for new targeted therapies
 
Faculty
Val AdamsPharmD, BCOP, FCCP
Associate Professor, Pharmacy Program Director, PGY2 Specialty Residency, Hematology/Oncoloty, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-057-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
This presentation will review recent literature and FDA approvals that have changed the standard of care in the pharmacologic management of breast cancer. Topics will cover the use of CKD4/6 inhibitors and their current place in therapy, the addition of Pertuzumab to neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, extended therapy with Neratinib, and Olaparib - the first PARP inhibitor to be approved for breast cancer treatment. Expected toxicity and practical approaches to side effect management will also be discussed. Finally, we will look ahead to see if any breakthrough treatments for triple negative breast cancer are on the horizon. Short patient cases with multiple choice questions will be used at the beginning and end of each objective to enhance active learning.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Differentiate between available CDK4/6 inhibitors used in the treatment of hormone positive metastatic breast cancer based on clinical efficacy and tolerability
  • Explore the changing landscape of Her2 positive early stage breast cancer treatment
  • Discuss the utility of selected biomarkers to guide treatment decisions in metastatic breast cancer
  • Appraise emerging strategies for the treatment of triple negative breast cancer
 
Faculty
Michael BergerPharmD, BCOP
Clinical Specialist Pharmacist, Breast Medical Oncology The Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital at The Ohio State University Medical Center
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-059-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
This presentation will distinguish between reference biologics and biosimiars. It will discuss what information is really required for approval by the FDA. It will define the process of extrapolation and dispel some of the statements made concerning biosimilars. The program will review the currently FDA approved biosimilars and those that are commercially available. It will also take a in-depth look at the biosimilar pipeline and what products to expect in the coming years.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Distinguish between reference biologic and a biosimilar from development to commercialization
  • List 3 key factors used to establish extrapolation for a biosimilar
  • Describe 2 ways that P & T committee review is different from biosimilars than for generics
  • List the current FDA approved biosimilars and which are commercially available in the US market
  • Describe the current biosimilar pipeline and what products we can expect out in the next year or so
 
Faculty
Jim KoellerMS
Professor of Pharmacy, Medicine & Oncology, University of Texas at Austin and the Health Science Center
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-18-062-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
PharmCon, Inc.
 
 
 
 
Requirements for CE Credit
  • Participant Requirement and Statement of Credit: To receive credit, participants must fully attend each session (no partial credit will be awarded), pass in a completed attendance verification form, and using the access code provided, complete the online evaluation for each session attended. Attendance will be verified. All participants will have the opportunity to evaluate the educational sessions and presenters as well as the ability to identify their
  • Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians: CE credit will be automatically uploaded to CPE Monitor upon completion of the evaluation and posted to the participant’s NABP account within 72 hours where an official certificate of credit can be printed. Evaluations must be completed within 60 days of program date to receive credit.
  • Statement of Disclosure: Disclosure will be made on the day of the program regarding any interest or affiliation a speaker may have with a supporting organization.
  • Refund Policy: A full refund will be provided only if a written request is received by American Health Resources, LLC at least 48 hours prior to the program or if the program is cancelled. American Health Resources, LLC reserves the right to change the presenters, topics or seminar schedules.
 
Only Certificates of Credit issued from CPE Monitor are valid in the US.
CPE Monitor will not accept credits after 60 days from the session date.
 
Supported By:
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
Registration closes on 10/11/2018 at 11:00 PM
 

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