EVENT DETAILS
Friday, October 11, 2019
Boston Marriott Burlington
1 Burlington Mall Road, Burlington, MA 01803
Dates
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Total Credits
16.25 Contact Hour(s)
Target Audience
Nurse , Pharmacist
Cost
$160.00
Registration closes on 10/10/2019 at 11:00 PM
Early Registration: $160.00
Cost After 9/20/2019: $180.00
 

Registration will be held from 8:00 am - 8:30 am. Continental breakfast will be served during this time.

A plated lunch will be served from 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm.

Refreshments will be served during the afternoon programs.
 

AGENDA

Scheduled CE Activities Friday, October 11, 2019
One Day Registration Cost: $130.00  
Learn how the tragedy of losing one’s two-year-old daughter, Emily Jerry, has led to a positive impact on the entire patient safety movement. Christopher Jerry, Emily’s father, turned this tragedy into a triumph by developing the Emily Jerry Foundation and the impacting the development of the “Emily Law “in Ohio in 2009.   His passion for patient safety has grown to advocate for the patient as well as the caregiver.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Describe how poorly designed medication systems can contribute to serious, even fatal, errors.
  • Identify and breakdown the factors that resulted in the death of Emily Jerry in 2006 which lead to the prosecution of Eric Cropp.
  • Distinguish ways that institutions can respond to errors and how it influences patients, caregivers, future error reporting, and system improvements.
  • Define Second victim and describe what resources are available to RPh’s that may need support dealing with medication errors.
  • Recognize the five rights of the Second Victim (caregiver) when a patient is harmed during the process of care.
  • Define just culture and the influence that culture can have on improving the safety of patient care.
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Describe how poorly designed medication systems can contribute to serious, even fatal, errors.
  • Identify and breakdown the factors that resulted in the death of Emily Jerry in 2006 which lead to the prosecution of Eric Cropp.
  • Distinguish ways that institutions can respond to errors and how it influences patients, caregivers, future error reporting, and system improvements.
  • Define Second victim and describe what resources are available to RPh’s that may need support dealing with medication errors.
  • Recognize the five rights of the Second Victim (caregiver) when a patient is harmed during the process of care.
  • Define just culture and the influence that culture can have on improving the safety of patient care.
 
Faculty
Chris Jerry Eric CroppPharmD
Pharmacist
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-030-L05-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-030-L05-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1.5
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health resources, LLC.
 

Colorectal cancer is the 3rd most common cancer in both men women in the United States.   Prevention and screening continue to be at the forefront in helping deter this disease.  Treatment advances in colorectal cancer continue to benefit patients by introducing new pharmacologic modalities.   Immuno-oncology therapies are starting to play an increased role in certain colorectal cancers.   The purpose of this presentation will be to update the audience on the new pharmacologic advances in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

 

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the incidence and prevalence of colorectal cancer therapies
  • Differentiate among treatment modalities used in various stages of colorectal cancer
  • Identify the role of immune-oncology in colorectal cancer
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the incidence and prevalence of colorectal cancer therapies
  • Differentiate among treatment modalities used in various stages of colorectal cancer
  • Identify the role of immune-oncology in colorectal cancer
 
Faculty
Adam PeelePharmD, MHA, BCPS, BCOP
Director of Oncology Pharmacy Services, Oncology Pharmacy Residency Director, Clinical Hematology/Oncology Pharmacist Cone Health System
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-031-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-031-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health resources, LLC.
 
Unique challenges exist when managing older adults with cancer – specifically, associations between cancer and age-related physiologic changes which have a direct impact on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cancer therapies. These challenges can affect drug dosing, dose intensity, efficacy, safety and quality of life however the breadth and depth of these issues have not been fully evaluated because the majority of clinical trials have focused on a younger and healthier population. As a consequence, there is a substantial lack of information to support clinicians to make evidence-based decisions regarding treatment with cancer therapies in older adults, especially those over age 75. Broadening trials to capture chronologic age and also functional age would allow clinicians to identify subsets of older adults who benefit from treatment versus those most vulnerable to morbidity and/or mortality. Pharmacists, nurses and allied health providers should be aware of this concept given the expansive implications on treatment-related effects.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Describe factors associated with under-enrollment of older adults in cancer trials and its impact on treatment decisions
  • Recognize how age-related physiologic changes and functional age can influence the pharmacology of cancer treatments
  • Describe validated tools used to screen for ‘inappropriate’ polypharmacy and to identify chemotherapy toxicity risk in older adults
  • Identify the latest recommendations to improve the generation of evidence for treating older adults
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Describe factors associated with under-enrollment of older adults in cancer trials and its impact on treatment decisions
  • Recognize how age-related physiologic changes and functional age can influence the pharmacology of cancer treatments
  • Describe validated tools used to screen for ‘inappropriate’ polypharmacy and to identify chemotherapy toxicity risk in older adults
  • Identify the latest recommendations to improve the generation of evidence for treating older adults
 
Faculty
Ginah NightingalePharmD, BCOP
Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Jefferson College of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-032-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-032-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health resources, LLC.
 

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is common in cancer patients, resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. These patients have higher rates of both VTE recurrence and bleeding compared with the non-cancer VTE patient population. Low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) have been the standard of care to treat cancer-associated thrombosis for decades, but several studies have been published and more still are underway describing the use of direct oral anticoagulants in these patients. These drugs are an attractive option as they do not require injection nor do they require routine laboratory monitoring. Additionally, recent data has emerged describing the use of DOACs for primary prevention of cancer-associated VTE. This presentation will discuss these topics, review the published studies of DOACs for treatment and prevention of cancer-associated VTE, and offer an evidence-based approach to the selection of an anticoagulant agent in cancer patients based on disease- and patient-related characteristics.

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Describe the findings of recent studies comparing direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) with low molecular weight heparins for the treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis.
  • Describe the studies examining the utility of DOACs for primary prevention of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients.
  • Identify cancer patient subpopulations for whom DOACs are optimal and those subpopulations for whom DOACs should be avoided.
  • Recognize the unique aspects of the cancer patient population that make anticoagulation higher risk in these patients.
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Describe the findings of recent studies comparing direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) with low molecular weight heparins for the treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis.
  • Describe the studies examining the utility of DOACs for primary prevention of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients.
  • Identify cancer patient subpopulations for whom DOACs are optimal and those subpopulations for whom DOACs should be avoided.
  • Recognize the unique aspects of the cancer patient population that make anticoagulation higher risk in these patients.
 
Faculty
Hanny Al-SamkariMD, BA, BS
Attending Physician, Clinical Assistant in Medicine Division of Hematology Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-033-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-033-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health resources, LLC.
 
This presentation will distinguish between reference biologics and biosimilars. It will discuss the analytical data needed to establish biosimilarity.   It will define the scientific process of extrapolation and dispel some of the statements and misconceptions made concerning biosimilars.  The program will review the currently FDA approved oncology biosimilars and those that are commercially available.  It will also take an in-depth look at the oncology biosimilar pipeline and what products to expect in the coming year.
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • List the oncology agents that are currently commercially available, and what’s the potential timeline for those not available
  • Describe what misconceptions exist with the term ‘highly similar’ used to describe a biosimilar
  • Identify the totality of evidence necessary to establish extrapolated indications
  • Describe the types of therapeutic data needed to establish effectiveness in curative diseases.
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • List the oncology agents that are currently commercially available, and what’s the potential timeline for those not available
  • Describe what misconceptions exist with the term ‘highly similar’ used to describe a biosimilar
  • Identify the totality of evidence necessary to establish extrapolated indications
  • Describe the types of therapeutic data needed to establish effectiveness in curative diseases.
 
Faculty
Jim KoellerMS
Professor of Pharmacy, Medicine & Oncology, University of Texas at Austin and the Health Science Center
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-034-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-034-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health resources, LLC.
 

The guidelines for the appropriate compounding of both sterile and hazardous compounds have been in a state of revision and discussion for some time.  This session seeks to identify the draft regulations for both Sterile and Hazardous compounding as well as distinguish between proposed USP Chapter 800 requirements and the requirements under state Board of Pharmacy regulations.

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize current draft regulations for Sterile Compounding, 247 CMR 17.00
  • Recognize current draft regulations for Hazardous Medications, 247 CMR 19.00
  • Differentiate between the proposed USP Chapter 800 requirements and requirements under Board of Pharmacy regulations
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize current draft regulations for Sterile Compounding, 247 CMR 17.00
  • Recognize current draft regulations for Hazardous Medications, 247 CMR 19.00
  • Differentiate between the proposed USP Chapter 800 requirements and requirements under Board of Pharmacy regulations
 
Faculty
David SeaverRPh, JD
Senior Risk Manager, Brigham & Women's Hospital
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-035-L03-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-035-L03-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health resources, LLC.
 

Scheduled CE Activities Saturday, October 12, 2019
One Day Registration Cost: $130.00  

Seventh Degree Black Belt/Master Instructor Chris Natzke uses martial arts as a metaphor for life.  In sharing his “7 Qualities of Black Belt Leadership” with pharmacy teams and management, the session demonstrates how following these principles can positively impact the lives of patients and healthcare leadership teams.  Through the elements of ‘purposeful vision’, ‘becoming the change’, ‘personal integrity’, ‘conscious persistence’, ‘compassionate service’, ‘acceptance and surrender’, and ‘inspired action’, the session seeks to provide tools for both personal and team leadership transformation. 

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the role that discipline plays in both personal transformation and effective leadership of a healthcare team.
  • Define ‘empowered empathy’ and recognize the impact of compassionate service in the practice of pharmacy.
  • Recognize the benefits of ‘purposeful vision’ for the effective leadership of a healthcare team.
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the role that discipline plays in both personal transformation and effective leadership of a healthcare team.
  • Define ‘empowered empathy’ and recognize the impact of compassionate service in the practice of pharmacy.
  • Recognize the benefits of ‘purposeful vision’ for the effective leadership of a healthcare team.
 
Faculty
Chris NatzkePharmD
Attending Physician, Clinical Assistant in Medicine Division of Hematology Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-036-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-036-L04-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1.25
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health resources, LLC.
 
Treatments for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) had remained essentially unchanged for several years; however, the advent of molecular testing has generated insight into the biology of this disease which is now being translated into clinical practice.  Several new therapies have emerged that have changed the current landscape of AML.  The introduction of CPX-351 offers a novel strategy for treating patients with therapy-related AML or AML with myelodysplasia-related changes; gemtuzumab ozogamicin may become incorporated into standard induction therapy, especially for patients with core-binding factor leukemias; and for older adults, combination therapy with venetoclax may offer a more efficacious strategy than the single-agent regimens previously used. Additionally, targeted therapies are now becoming available for patients with mutations in FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) or isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2, ushering in an era of personalized medicine in the treatment of AML.  All of these new therapies require novel implementation and evaluation for patients. 
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Describe the currently available treatment strategies for patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)
  • Describe novel and emerging therapeutic options in AML and their mechanisms of action (MOAs)
  • Recognize safety and efficacy data for novel and emerging therapeutic options
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Describe the currently available treatment strategies for patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)
  • Describe novel and emerging therapeutic options in AML and their mechanisms of action (MOAs)
  • Recognize safety and efficacy data for novel and emerging therapeutic options
 
Faculty
Ali McBridePharmD, MS, BCOP, FAzPA, FASHP
Clinical Coordinator of Hematology/Oncology ,The University of Arizona Cancer Center; Clinical Assistant Professor, The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-037-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-037-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1.5
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health resources, LLC.
 

This presentation will cover recent updates to breast cancer literature and FDA approvals of drugs used in the treatment of breast cancer. Changes to adjuvant antiHER2 therapy will be discussed as well as new options for treatment of hormone receptor-negative, HER2-negative breast cancer. Potential side effects of drugs and management, if applicable, will be reviewed during this presentation. Future directions for treatment of breast cancer will be highlighted.

 

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the changes in treatment for early stage HER2-positive breast cancer
  • Compare efficacy and toxicities of new agents approved for the treatment of triple negative breast cancer
  • Describe management of immunotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the changes in treatment for early stage HER2-positive breast cancer
  • Compare efficacy and toxicities of new agents approved for the treatment of triple negative breast cancer
  • Describe management of immunotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer
 
Faculty
Neelam PatelPharmD, BCOP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Breast Medical Oncology; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-038-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-038-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 

Discuss the emerging roles of immunotherapy and targeted therapy in the management of non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, has become the new standard of care for most patients with non-small cell lung cancer without a targetable mutation. We will review the trials that have led to this change in practice.

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Identify clinical evidence for new and emerging treatment options in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.
  • Describe key patient counseling and monitoring considerations for immunotherapy and targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer.
  • Apply best practices to manage the adverse events associated with the new therapies available for advanced non-small cell lung cancer.
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Identify clinical evidence for new and emerging treatment options in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.
  • Describe key patient counseling and monitoring considerations for immunotherapy and targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer.
  • Apply best practices to manage the adverse events associated with the new therapies available for advanced non-small cell lung cancer.
 
Faculty
Sally BarbourPharmD, BCOP, CPP, FHOPA
Director, Oncology Pharmacy Programs, Oncology Pharmacy Residency Program Director; Duke University Medical Center Clinical Pharmacist Practitioner
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-039-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-039-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 

This program is intended for pharmacists, in any practice setting, that may encounter patients that have been treated with CAR T-cell therapies.  We will discuss the current landscape of CAR T-cell therapies and their appropriate place in therapy.  By the end of the presentation, the audience will better understand CRS and neurotoxicity associated with CAR T-cell therapy and how to manage it appropriately. 

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Identify currently approved CAR T-cell products and their place in therapy
  • Describe cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity associated with CAR T-cell administration
  • Identify appropriate treatment strategies for CRS and neurotoxicity
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Identify currently approved CAR T-cell products and their place in therapy
  • Describe cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity associated with CAR T-cell administration
  • Identify appropriate treatment strategies for CRS and neurotoxicity
 
Faculty
Larry BuiePharmD, BCOP, FASHP
Clinical Pharmacy Manager, Lymphoma and BMT, Residency Program Director, PGY2 Oncology; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-040-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-040-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 

The presentation will review monoclonal antibodies that have been studied in multiple myeloma, their mechanism of action and the clinical trials that led to their approval. We will also discuss their adverse event profile and their place in therapy. Finally, we will discuss the newer monoclonal antibodies in the pipeline.

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognzie the mechanism of action of the monoclonal antibodies in myeloma
  • Summarize the clinical trials that led to their approval
  • Describe the utilization of elotuzumab and daratumumab in clinical practice
  • Define myeloma bone disease, with focus on denosumab
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the mechanism of action of the monoclonal antibodies in myeloma
  • Summarize the clinical trials that led to their approval
  • Describe elotuzumab and daratumumab in clinical practice
  • Define myeloma bone disease, with focus on denosumab
 
Faculty
Houry LeblebjianPharmD, BCOP
Clinical Pharmacy Practice Administrator; Dana Farber Cancer Institure
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-041-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-041-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 

The presentation will review the approved immunotherapy agents, their mechanism of action and how they could lead to immune related toxicities. We will also review treatment guidelines and algorithms that are used at BWH/DFCI to treat those toxicities and our approach to triage patients with immune related toxicity to the ITOX service. We will highlight the important role that pharmacists play in the development and implementation of the ITOX program and discuss future directions.

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • To understand the mechanism of immune related toxicities
  • To review specific immune related toxicities
  • To describe the ITOX program and how its utilized to tackle immune toxicities
  • The pharmacist role in ITOX program
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • To understand the mechanism of immune related toxicities
  • To review specific immune related toxicities
  • To describe the ITOX program and how its utilized to tackle immune toxicities
  • The pharmacist role in ITOX program
 
Faculty
Osama RahmaMD
Assistant Professor of Medicine Department of Medicine; Harvard Medical School
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-043-L04-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-043-L04-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the role of current anticancer therapies in the management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI NET)
  • Recognize the evolving use of theranostics within GI NET
  • Describe the complexities and intricacies involved with lutetium-177 dotatate therapy
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the role of current anticancer therapies in the management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI NET)
  • Recognize the evolving use of theranostics within GI NET
  • Describe the complexities and intricacies involved with lutetium-177 dotatate therapy
 
Faculty
Jon AstonPharmD
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, GI Medical Oncology Clinic; Vanderbilt University Medical Center
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-042-L01-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-042-L01-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 

USP <800> is scheduled to become enforceable December 1, 2019, and many states boards of pharmacy, as well as other federal agencies, will be adopting the chapter into regulatory framework at this time. This program will provide a high-level overview of the application of USP <800> in a sterile compounding practice. Resources for identifying hazardous drugs, engineering controls to minimize exposure, and containment strategies will be discussed.

 
 
Pharmacist Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the classification of a hazardous drug per USP <800>.
  • Describe containment as required for sterile compounding in USP <800>.
  • Recognize how to apply an Assessment of Risk to utilize alternative work practices.
Nurse Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the classification of a hazardous drug per USP <800>.
  • Describe containment as required for sterile compounding in USP <800>.
  • Recognize how to apply an Assessment of Risk to utilize alternative work practices.
 
Faculty
Jon PritchettPharmD, RPh
Associate Director, Pharmacy; Accreditation Commission for Healthcare
 
ACPE UAN
0280-0000-19-044-L07-P (Knowledge-Based)
0280-0000-19-044-L07-N (Knowledge-Based)
 
Credits
1
 
Handouts
 
Supported By
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
 
 
 
Requirements for CE Credit
  • Participant Requirement and Statement of Credit: To receive credit, participants must fully attend each session (no partial credit will be awarded), pass in a completed attendance verification form, and using the access code provided, complete the online evaluation for each session attended. Attendance will be verified. All participants will have the opportunity to evaluate the educational sessions and presenters.
  • Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians: CE credit will be automatically uploaded to CPE Monitor upon completion of the evaluation and posted to the participant’s NABP account within 72 hours where an official certificate of credit can be printed. Evaluations must be completed within 60 days of program date to receive credit.
  • Statement of Disclosure: Disclosure will be made on the day of the program regarding any interest or affiliation a speaker may have with a supporting organization.
  • Refund Policy: A full refund will be provided only if a written request is received by American Health Resources, LLC at least 48 hours prior to the program or if the program is cancelled. American Health Resources, LLC reserves the right to change the presenters, topics or seminar schedules.
 
Only Certificates of Credit issued from CPE Monitor are valid in the US.
CPE Monitor will not accept credits after 60 days from the session date.
 
Supported By:
American Health Resources, LLC.
 
Registration closes on 10/10/2019 at 11:00 PM
 

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